New Yorker Cartoons Explained

It's a pig at a complaint department and he's saying "I wish I was taller."

Apr 5
newyorker:

Today’s daily cartoon by Barbara Smaller: http://nyr.kr/1lqZHs1

"And of course there is also unconscious uncoupling: the coupling we don’t know we have uncoupled." —Donald Rumsfeld

newyorker:

Today’s daily cartoon by Barbara Smaller: http://nyr.kr/1lqZHs1

"And of course there is also unconscious uncoupling: the coupling we don’t know we have uncoupled." —Donald Rumsfeld


Anonymous asked: The drawing was of an insect and the caption simply read "Mr. Perfect.

image

This cartoon underscores the fact that the elusive “Mr. Perfect” doesn’t exist. Even if you find a great guy with two heads, a ripped thorax, and saws for arms, he’ll probably turn out to be super religious.


Mar 30
newyorker:

A cartoon by Harry Bliss. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1dmeCy6

Rocks are inanimate objects, incapable of thoughts or feelings, much less second chances. As a result, we all understand that Roxy will not take Brock back. Similarly, the burglars who walked through this propped open front door will not be taking back all the stuff they stole from the homeowner who created this amusing tableau.

newyorker:

A cartoon by Harry Bliss. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1dmeCy6

Rocks are inanimate objects, incapable of thoughts or feelings, much less second chances. As a result, we all understand that Roxy will not take Brock back. Similarly, the burglars who walked through this propped open front door will not be taking back all the stuff they stole from the homeowner who created this amusing tableau.


Mar 15

waterincoporated asked: It's a carotoon from William Hamilton: I think they'll be perfect together - he's a journlist and she's a complete composite: It's item number Item #: 8539458 in the condenast store. What does this mean? thanks - Pete

The overeager matchmaker in this cartoon is trying to set up her two friends at a dinner party. This cartoon is funny because we all know how this will end: murder.


Mar 7
newyorker:

A cartoon by Edward Steed. For more cartoons from this week’s issue of the magazine: http://nyr.kr/1jMGlwC

In order to escape an uncomfortable first encounter with his girlfriend’s parents, the man on the right in this cartoon is planning to covertly dial his own home phone number in order to render the nice couple unconscious, due to the deafening noise of his massive telephone. They’ll resume consciousness several hours later with permanent hearing loss and partial brain damage. Awkward crisis averted.

newyorker:

A cartoon by Edward Steed. For more cartoons from this week’s issue of the magazine: http://nyr.kr/1jMGlwC

In order to escape an uncomfortable first encounter with his girlfriend’s parents, the man on the right in this cartoon is planning to covertly dial his own home phone number in order to render the nice couple unconscious, due to the deafening noise of his massive telephone. They’ll resume consciousness several hours later with permanent hearing loss and partial brain damage. Awkward crisis averted.


Mar 2
newyorker:

A cartoon by Michael Crawford. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1ejl8oa

In this cartoon, a ballerina is posing for a portrait artist, but the artist is painting a picture of a swan. What a humorous mix-up! But it’s not a mix-up at all. Take another look at the ballerina. She’s not a ballerina at all, but the very swan the artist is (quite accurately) painting. I’ve also stolen your watch.

newyorker:

A cartoon by Michael Crawford. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1ejl8oa

In this cartoon, a ballerina is posing for a portrait artist, but the artist is painting a picture of a swan. What a humorous mix-up! But it’s not a mix-up at all. Take another look at the ballerina. She’s not a ballerina at all, but the very swan the artist is (quite accurately) painting. I’ve also stolen your watch.


Feb 26
newyorker:

The Daily Cartoon by Tom Toro: http://nyr.kr/1cmWxzt

Too soon.

newyorker:

The Daily Cartoon by Tom Toro: http://nyr.kr/1cmWxzt

Too soon.


Feb 13

Anonymous asked: In the Jan. 20 2014 issue on page 50: A pig, lying on the psychiatrist's couch, asks "Why are we here?" The psychiatrist, also a pig, says nothing, but there's a tear rolling down his cheek. Is it that they're here merely to become bacon?? If so, that's so depressing and not funny at all!! I sure hope I'm missing something ... Thank you! R

This cartoon is not about bacon at all. It’s about the devastating agony of suffering through daily life in a meaningless, godless universe where nothing we do matters in the remotest sense. So it’s actually quite humorous.


Anonymous asked: Page 78 in the Anniversary issue, Feb. 17/24, 2014. Two octopuses with array of colors, a third with what looks like a color wheel. Caption: Fifth hand, pale chartreuse. What is this about?

image

This octopus version of Twister needs to have 24 unique rows to accommodate their eight appendages. Because there are not 24 color words in the English language, the surly octopus on the lower right has had to resort to making up words like “chartreuse.”


Jan 3

Anonymous asked: My instructions were to the release the tigers the minute Uncle Henry arrived. (In the cartoon a young man is opening a cage as presumably Uncle Henry arrives.) Help...I don't understand this.

I need a link to the cartoon, or at the very least, some more information about what issue it was printed in so I can maybe find it myself.


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